Insights & Advice

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The U.S. and China Square off

 

In Beijing this week the annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit is winding down. As representatives from its 21 member nations return home, one thing is certain.  China has become America’s main rival for influence in that region.

Depending on who you talk to, China’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is expected to overtake that of the United States sometime in the next five years. Some argue that it may be sooner than that. But while we Americans might fret over falling to second place economically, China’s communist leaders could care less. They are eyeing a far larger prize—control of much of the world’s natural resources and the means to transport them back to China.

There is nothing underhanded or dishonest about their ambitions. For the last decade, China has been investing, purchasing and partnering with countries and companies worldwide. Whether developing a Peruvian mountain loaded with copper or inking an energy deal with Russia’s Vladimir Putin, China is methodically expanding its control over the means of production worldwide.  This week’s tariff and free-trade deals among Asian nations and the United States is simply another step in their long-term plan.

Much has been made of President Obama’s agreements on Tuesday to reduce tariffs on a range of technology products worldwide including videogame consoles, semi-conductor chips and even prepaid cards. The media also applauded an agreement by the two nations to further reduce greenhouse gasses and expand the duration of visas for education and business. There was even some progress on developing some military and defense initiatives.

However, in my opinion, China’s real objective was to convince Asian members that their plan to extend their economic influence to energy-rich Central Asia was good for everyone concerned. The Chinese are dangling a host of goodies from a free-trade deal in competition with one of our own, and $90 billion in infrastructure investment funds as well as additional investment from an army of Chinese private and state corporations. It is tempting.

You see, China wants to create a “Silk Road Economic Belt.” Their objective would be to establish a far-reaching network of transportation, distribution and logistics that would bind China, Central Asia and Europe into one vast economic network.   No one is laughing. Asian members only have to look at China’s track record in South America and Africa, among other places, to understand just how serious the Chinese are. Strapped for investment, struggling with anemic economies and high unemployment rates, many of these nations would just love to invite the Chinese into their parlors.

If there is a fly in this Chinese ointment, it is of China’s own making. Territorial disputes instigated by China with the Philippines, Vietnam and Japan over the last few years have made many nations wary of China’s true intentions. Fortunately, all sides have backed off from a shooting war but China’s increasingly aggressive military stance has many neighbors troubled.

It is one thing to invite an investment partner into one’s country, but quite another to risk occupation by such an acquisitive Big Brother such as China. In light of these fears, China’s willingness to talk turkey with the U.S. on military issues may simply be a ploy to alleviate these concerns among some nations.

The bottom line here is that while we at home continue to debate a pipeline that should have been built long ago, China is focusing on sewing up most of the world’s natural resources. It is that kind of long-range planning that we need here in America. Unfortunately, we neither have the will nor the leaders to implement such a strategy. And we will regret it.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in A Few Dollars More, Macroeconomics