Insights & Advice

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Patience is a Virtue

“So was that the pullback you were looking for?”

“Let’s say it was the beginning of one,” I answered.

“So how much longer am I supposed to wait? I’ve got tons of cash and it’s not earning me anything.”

Sometimes the hardest thing in the world is to do nothing. This ap[pears to be one of those times. Yes, we did pull back over 1% earlier in the week in all three averages but the downside was short-lived and the markets regained all they had lost by the end of the week. We can thank world governments for that performance.

The EU and its central bank successfully concluded the renegotiation of Greek debt. Just over 80% of Greek bond holders “volunteered” to exchange their old bonds for new ones that are worth less than half the value. For all intents and purposes this amounts to a massive bond default by the Greek government, but that’s not how it is playing out.

When governments are involved, what normally would have become a default becomes something else. In this case it becomes a “restructuring” and not an embarrassing default. The markets rallied, bidding up European stock markets at the news. They ignored comments from the head of the European Central bank who said that further interest rate cuts and other stimulus measures are at an end. At the same time, the fact that Europe is also entering a recession seemed to be unimportant.  

  In the U.S., the Federal Reserve added to the cheer by planting a story in the Wall Street Journal. The gist of the article was that the Fed is considering a new kind of bond purchase that would boost the economy further but would be designed to reduce the inflationary impact of such purchases. The economic term for this is “sterilization” and just the mention of additional easing had investors buying back stocks. As I explained last week, the entire move up in the markets since October has been based on central banks flooding world markets with more and more money. This is like offering investors a huge punchbowl with all you can drink right now. Nothing else matters right now and like those who indulge too often and too much there will be a price to be paid down the road.

As I pointed out to a client this week, the markets did recover on all this good news but are still at about the same level they were when I suggested lightening up on your most aggressive equity holdings. Actually, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was around 13,000 at the time and it is now trading lower than that.

The S&P 500 Index and NASDAQ are where they were on March 1. Gold and silver have been losing trades for the last few weeks as well. But don’t get me wrong; I’m not bearish, just cautious in the short-term. I expect a choppy market at best and in that kind of environment it pays to wait it out.

Many investors believe the sidelines are an unacceptable position in today’s markets. Granted, sitting in cash at money market rates yielding next to nothing is akin to watching grass grow in the middle of winter. The point I would make is that sitting in cash is not about making money. It is about not losing money and that can be a smart move sometimes.

I have no crystal ball that tells me this period of caution will only last a week or two or drag on for a longer period of time. I’m guessing it will be shorter than longer so I’m willing to keep the cash and forego investing it in bonds or something else that provides a greater yield. Part of that decision is based on tax considerations and trading costs. However, those may not be important considerations to you. I can only council patience; the rest is up to you.

Posted in A Few Dollars More, At the Market