Insights & Advice

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Markets held hostage by trade and machines

If it were not for computer-driven trading, it might actually be funny. Financial markets are careening up and down on a daily basis based on the next tweet or comment from the Trump Administration or its counterparts in China. We could see more of the same next week.

Rhyme or reason has truly left the station. Day by day, the trade war of words is accelerating. This week, the U.S. banned China’s largest technology company, Huawei, from doing business with American companies. The president accused the company of espionage. The Chinese responded by threatening to drop trade negotiations. Markets collapsed, led by semi-conductor and technology stocks.

A day later, the administration walked back their ban, at least temporarily, once they realized the entire U.S. semiconductor industry would be crippled by their move. Markets spiked higher. Then, Stephen Mnuchen, the U.S. Treasury Secretary, admitted there was no planned dates to resume trade talks– pow, markets fell again. Thursday, the President, in a free-wheeling news conference, announced a trade deal with China will happen “fast.” Confused investors jumped back into the markets chasing stocks up on Friday morning and down in the afternoon.

Over in China, there also appears to be an escalation in the tariff/trade verbiage. The Chinese government-controlled media have stepped up its anti-U.S. rhetoric, quoting Chinese officials, who are increasingly painting America and its leaders as irrational and unreasonable. A protest song of sorts has hit their air and internet waves, gaining massive popularity among the billions of Chinese citizens.

Rather than caving-in to our demands, it appears that China is hardening its stance and intensifying its “Made in China 2025” import substitution program. Readers may recall that China’s long-term economic strategy is to become self-sufficient in producing the goods and services they need to supply their increasingly affluent population. They envision a centrally planned mercantile society that, in the end, will cease to depend on the U.S. and its imports and rely solely on domestic production.

While China would prefer to wean its need for U.S. goods and services gradually, over a period of a few more years, if push comes to shove, they seem willing to take the hard road, and cut off much of their trade with the U.S. if negotiations fail. After all, while the population may suffer and economic growth would slow, it’s not as if the Chinese populace can vote Xi Jinping out of office.

Xi, last week, actually gave a speech in Yudu, a small county where Mao Tse Tung’s Long March began, 85 years ago. The two-year march, over some of China’s most rugged and difficult terrain during the Chinese civil war, is the stuff of legends within China. Xi’s message was clear: China may be in for another long march of “enduring hardship” and should be prepared if negotiations fail.

Despite this war of words, the majority of investors still believe that a deal will be done and done fairly quickly. As such, any hint that reflects positively on the trade talks is an excuse to buy. This tendency is exasperated by computers that are programmed to respond to certain key words (that signal it to buy or sell the markets).

Computers cannot reason. They do not know if the President’s tweets or statements are backed up by facts and they don’t care. Neither, evidently, do human investors. I can see this continue to play out until June 1. That’s the date when China’s second round of tariffs will be levied on U.S. goods. That’s next weekend. If no breakthrough occurs by then, and I don’t believe it will, then expect the next shoe to drop and the markets with it.

 

 

 

 

Posted in A Few Dollars More, At the Market